Tiny Portraits

March 17th, 2014
Tiny Portraits, by Sam Boyce, AFL Volunteer

Tiny Portraits, by Sam Boyce, AFL Volunteer

Tiny Portraits, by Sam Boyce, AFL Volunteer2

Skill Level: 2+

Time Frame: 30+minutes

Goals

  • Combine printmaking and painting to learn simple portraiture concepts.

Materials

  • Styrofoam
  • Lines & Pattern Sheet
  • Ballpoint Pen
  • Printing Ink
  • Brayer
  • Barren
  • Plexiglass
  • Watercolor paper
  • Watercolor
  • Paintbrushes and Water
  • Blow Dryer
  • Black Sharpie

Directions

  1. Draw a small frame (oval, circle, square, or rectangle) on Styrofoam.
  2. Use the lines and patterns worksheet as inspiration for the design you will add to your frame. Draw the design with a ball point pen.
  3. Cut out the frame – be careful when cutting the inside and ask a teacher to help get this section started.
  4. Choose an ink color and squirt a small amount on to the plexiglass. Spread out the ink with the brayer until you hear a “kissing” sound.
  5. Roll the ink on to the frame.
  6. Set a sheet of watercolor paper on top of the frame and press evenly with a barren or the palm of your hand. Lift up the paper and allow the ink to dry (speed up the process with a blow dryer).
  7. While the ink dries, think of who you want to paint a portrait of. What would the outline of this person look like?
  8. Once the ink is dry, create the outline of the person inside the frame with a solid color of watercolor paint. Fill in so you have a colorful form in the frame. Dry.
  9. Use a black Sharpie to add the detail of the person. Draw simple facial features, hair and clothing.

Tweak It!

  • Make a collection of portraits – maybe your family or closest friends?
  • Think big! Make a big frame and paint a large portrait, or a family portrait inside.

© 2014 Arts For Life

Printed Pattern Quotes

March 17th, 2014
Pattern Picasso Quote by Betsey

Pattern Picasso Quote by Betsey

Skill Level: 1+

Time Frame: 30+minutes

Goals

  • Apply abstract concepts to drawing and printmaking while identifying elements of design.
  • Encourage self expression through typography and communication of a word or quote that is important to the individual artist.

Materials

  • White Cardstock – 8×10
  • Markers
  • Styrofoam sheets – 8×10
  • Copy Paper – 8×10
  • Ballpoint pen
  • Black sharpie
  • Plexiglass
  • Ink
  • Brayer
  • Barren

Directions – Part 1

  1. On a sheet of white cardstock, draw a pattern or design.
  2. Color in using a monochromatic color scheme (different shades of one color).
  3. Fill in as much of the paper with color as possible; some white is okay.
  4. Set aside.

Printed Pattern Quotes_2

Directions – Part 2

  1. Choose a favorite word or short quote.
  2. Write the word or quote on to the sheet of copy paper, keeping your letters large and spaced apart so you can widen each letter on the Styrofoam.
  3. Trace over the letters in black sharpie.
  4. Turn your paper over and place, sharpie side down, on to the sheet of Styrofoam. Trace over the letters (everything will be backwards) with a ballpoint pen. Remove the paper.
  5. Make a solid impression/indentation in the Styrofoam with the ballpoint pen. The letters need to be wide, no less than 1/8 inch, but ¼ inch will show your pattern well.

Printed Pattern Quotes_3

  1. Once the letters are done, choose a color of ink that is complementary to the colors in your pattern drawing. Squeeze on to the plexiglass and use the brayer to spread the ink out.
  2. Roll the ink on to the Styrofoam.
  3. Place the pattern drawing face down on top of the inked Styrofoam. Use a barren or the palm of your hand to apply even pressure over the paper.
  4. Peel off the paper to reveal the quote!

Tweak It!

  • If time is short, use pattern scrapbook paper to print your quote on.

Printed Pattern Quotes_4

  • Instead of printing with Styrofoam, cut individual letters from contact paper, peel and stick to the pattern paper. Paint over top of the letters and paper with acrylic paint. Peel off stickers once dry.

© 2014 Arts For Life

 

Marker Print Pattern Quilts

March 17th, 2014
Collaborative Quilt from Zamorano Fine Arts Academy, link below:
Collaborative Quilt from Zamorano Fine Arts Academy, link below:

http://zamoranoarts.blogspot.com/2013/02/all-together-now.html?showComment=1359776064165

Skill Level: 1+

Time Frame: 20+minutes

Goals

  • Discuss elements of design while drawing patterns and lines to create an abstract image.
  • Transform individual art in to a collaborative work by encouraging peer interaction and understanding of sharing artwork to create a larger work.

Materials

  • Styrofoam
  • Lines & Patterns sheet.
  • Ballpoint Pen
  • Washable Markers
  • Watercolor Paper
  • Water
  • Paper Towels
  • Colored or black cardstock

Teacher Prep

  • Cut sheets of Styrofoam in to assorted sizes of squares and rectangles.
  • Cut sheets of watercolor paper down to smaller sizes for printing the Styrofoam.

Directions

  1. Choose a piece of Styrofoam.
  2. Refer to the Lines and Patterns sheet for inspiration on different designs you can add to your foam.
  3. Use a ballpoint pen to create designs on the foam.
  4. Color the sections of the foam with washable markers.
  5. Dampen a piece of watercolor paper – if the paper is shiny, it is too wet and the colors will run together, be sure to blot it with paper towels.
  6. Place the wet watercolor paper on to the marker side of the foam. Press and smooth the back of the paper to get an even transfer of ink to the paper. Peel back.
  7. Repeat with the same design in different colors, or choose other sizes of Styrofoam and create a new design.
  8. Glue your prints to colored cardstock – there are lots of options for how to display: fold cardstock in half to make cards (glue to the front), glue on separate sheets of cardstock and display in a row, glue to the same sheet of cardstock, or even piece them together like a puzzle.

© 2014 Arts For Life

3D Cactus

March 17th, 2014
Cactus, by BetseyColor Cactus, by Emmi, age 4

Cactus, by Betsey         Color Cactus, by Emmi, age 4

Skill Level: 1+

Time Frame: 30+minutes

Fun Facts! 

From: http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/databases/cactus/growingcactus/

The cactus family (Cactaceae) is one of the most striking, distinctive, diversified and specialized groups in the plant kingdom. It includes about 2,000 species, and all of them are perennial and succulent.

Succulents are plants that have organs such as leaves, stems or roots that are capable of storing water during the rainy or wet season in order to survive extended periods of drought. All the plants in the cactus family (Opuntiacea = Cactacea) are considered stem succulents. During periods of moisture, the stem swells. Then during droughts, the stem slowly contracts. Cactus that have ribs are particularly well adapted to this because the ribs fill in and contract like an accordion.

Certain parts of the cactus are edible too! When nopales (nopalito means small) are cut or harvested in the young and tender stage, there are usually no spines yet developed. Nopales are taken only from prickly pear (nopal) cactus. The red fruit are called tuna (a Spanish word) and also have spines. The little stems, or pencos, are light green and as crisp and tender as lettuce. Nopales are a favorite Mexican vegetable, with flavor and texture similar to green beans, but firmer. The smaller leaves are more tender.

Cactus has also had other practical uses. The long, soft spines of Oerocereus celsianus are used as pillow and bed stuffing. Spines of other cacti are used as toothpicks, combs, sewing needles and fishhooks. Yet other cacti are used as building materials and as living fences or hedges.

 

Goals

  • Develop and improve spatial skills through sculpting and 3D concepts.
  • Discover new fact about cactus while creating a usable piece of artwork that encourages creative thinking.

Materials

  • Heavy watercolor paper OR Cardstock
  • Template
  • Pencil
  • Scissors
  • Crayons
  • Markers
  • Watercolors, Brushes, Water

Directions

  1. Choose between painting or markers. Use the appropriate paper for the medium you chose. Trace around the cactus template on two sheets of paper; or even better – design your own cactus!
  2. Cut the cacti out.
  3. Color or paint. Use crayons with the paint to draw the lines and spikes for a wax resist look.
  4. Color or paint both sides of your cactus cut outs.
  5. Cut a slit from the bottom of one cactus about 2 inches up. On the other cactus, cut a slit from the top, stopping 2 inches from the bottom.
  6. Slide the cacti together to create a 3D everlasting plant!

Tweak It!

  • Make flowers to add to the smaller stems/arms. Add by cutting a slit on the bottom of the flower and at the top of the stem/arm. Make lots of different flowers and your cactus can bloom a new flower every day!
  • Create any shape of cactus. How big or small can you make your cactus with the materials provided?
  • Use pattern paper or Washi Tape to add fun or abstract designs to your cactus.
Cactus Templae

Cactus Templae

© 2014 Arts For Life

 

 

Watercolor Tape Resist Names

March 17th, 2014
Artwork by Annie Rogers

Artwork by Annie Rogers

Skill Level: 2-5

Time Frame: 1 hr

Goals

  • To inspire creative thinking through the exploration of text and typography.
  • To learn and practice a variety of watercolor painting techniques.
  • To encourage self-expression with a project that combines elements of typography and painting.

Materials

  • Watercolor Paper cut into 6X9 pieces
  • Blue Painter’s Tape
  • Scissors
  • Watercolor Paints
  • Medium and Small Paintbrushes
  • Cups for Water
  • Salt, Alcohol, Plastic Wrap, bubble wrap, etc for creating watercolor effects
  • 2” Wide Masking Tape

Steps

  1. Spend some time looking at different types of fonts.  You can find hundreds of font styles on websites like http://www.fontsquirrel.com/  While you won’t be able to re-create any of the fonts perfectly using tape, they should provide you with plenty of inspiration as you are creating the letters of your name in the next step.
  2. Beginning with the first letter of your name, use the tape to create this letter on one of pieces of watercolor paper.  You may cut or tear the tape to create your letter.  Your letter may take up most of your paper, or it may be teeny-tiny in a corner.  There are no rules about what your letter must look like—it’s totally up to you.
  3. Continue by repeating step 2 with all the letters of your name. Make sure to rub over all your tape to ensure that adhesion is good.  The better it sticks, the cleaner your lines will be.
  4.  Use the watercolor paint and all the different effects to paint each of your papers differently. Some ideas:
    • Use salt on wet paint to create tiny starbursts.
    • Use alcohol to create a blob pattern.
    • Lay down one color of paint, allow to dry, and then paint over it with another; then use alcohol to allow the underlayer to emerge
    • Paint your whole paper with one color before completing step2,
    • Use an Ultrafine Sharpie to doodle inside your letter
  5. Allow all your pieces to dry.
  6. Place all your dried pieces side-by-side in order.  Keeping them in order, turn them over so the backside is facing up.  Tear a piece of 2” masking tape long enough to span all of your pieces, and stick it across the tops of all your papers.  Stick another one along the bottom.

Tweak It!

  • If you have a long name, try just doing your initials.
  • You can reverse the effect on some of your papers by lightly drawing a letter in pencil on your paper, then painting INSIDE the letter.

©2014 Arts For Life